welcome to Environment Management

Environment Management

23
Jan
2017

23-01-2017 - 25-01-2017
Rs.18,400.00

Introduction:

Municipal Waste management is one of the major global concerns of today. Waste generation is on a steep rise with new waste streams emerging that are complex and difficult to handle. Poor collection and indiscriminate disposal of untreated waste have led to contamination and degradation of the natural resources and ecosystems and have posed risks to human health. Costs of remediation and restoration of natural resources are much higher than the investments on sound management of wastes. One and half decade after the notification of the Municipal Solid Waste (MSW) Rules 2000, most Urban Local Bodies (ULBs) are today far from achieving compliance with the Rules. Today, mere compliance with MSW rules is however not sufficient. Managing wastes should no longer be limited to traditional ’end-of-pipe’ waste management that focuses only on collection, treatment and disposal. For sustainability and effectiveness, waste prevention, avoidance or reduction is the key. It is important that links between ’waste management’ and wider ambit of ’resource management’ are understood and practiced. The concept of Integrated Solid Waste Management (ISWM) needs to be expanded to Integrated Waste to Resource Management (IWRM). To address the above stated challenges and achieve compliance to MSW 2000 rules, urban areas require capacity building support to implement ISWM programmes and projects. About 0.1 million plus towns and cities generate 42 million tonnes at present with per capita generation of waste varying from 200 gm to 600 gm per capita / day. It is estimated that per capita waste generation is increasing by 1.3%. This will result in annual increase of waste generation to around 5%. Uncontrolled dumping of wastes on the outskirts of towns and cities continues to be the norm, which has serious implications both for public health as well as environmental pollution, especially groundwater contamination. There are very few successful examples in the area of scientific treatment, disposal and energy generation from waste. The training programme on “Best Practices on Solid Waste Management for Litter free, Dump free, Dustbin free cities in align with “Swachh Bharat Mission” is designed to share the best practices of MSW case studies in urban sector. The programme is structured to offer both conceptual and practical skills, providing the latest knowledge on key aspects of ISWM in promoting and strengthening the service delivery in compliance with MSW 2000 rules.

Rs.18,400.00 46
23
Jan
2017

23-01-2017 9:00 am - 25-11-2016 5:00 pm
Rs.18,400.00

INTRODUCTION:

Septage is the settled solid matter in semi-solid condition usually a mixture of solids and water settled at the bottom of septic tank. It has an offensive odour, appearance and is high in organics and pathogenic microorganisms. The National Family Health Survey-3 (NFHS, 2005-06) reported that that 17% urban households in India did not have access to any toilets at home, 24% households were sharing toilets (technologies not specified), about 19% had their toilets connected to sewers, the majority had on- site installations – about 27.6% households had septic tanks and 6.1% had pit latrines that were classified as “improved” and another 5% toilets were as “Flush/pour flush not to sewer/septic. The National Urban Sanitation Policy underlines the necessity for safe confinement and treatment of human excreta. The municipalities/ local government bodies are usually empowered for ensuring the safe handling and disposal of septage generated from on-site sanitary installations. In conformity with CPHEEO guidelines, these also establish local laws or regulations to govern septage handling and to meet all regulatory requirements and standards. While local bodies or utilities may be responsible for regulation over such practices, lack of systems, resources, capacities and incentives often result in neglect and continuance of uncontrolled dumping of septic tank wastes. Septic tank effluent and septage, with appreciable levels of organics, nitrogen and pathogens, disposed without proper treatment are a cause of concern on account of the organic carbon (as measured as BOD5), nitrogen, phosphorus and pathogens in the effluent. The National Rating of 423 Class I Indian Cities (covering 72% of Indian urban population) on Sanitation (MOUD, Govt. of India, May, 2010) found that 65% per cent (274) of these cities had unsatisfactory arrangements for safe collection of human excreta (whether on-site or sewerage).Government of India Initiatives under Urban Flagship missions like “AMRUT, Swachh Bharat and Rural Sanitation Policy” have emphasized all cities/ towns/ Rural areas should have proper Septage management and disposal practices.

Rs.18,400.00 46
23
Jan
2017

23-01-2017 9:00 am - 25-01-2017 5:15 pm
Rs.18,400.00

Introduction:

About 0.1 million plus towns and cities generate 42 million tonnes at present with per capita generation of waste varying from 200 gm to 600 gm per capita / day. It is estimated that per capita waste generation is increasing by 1.3%. This will result in annual increase of waste generation to around 5%. Uncontrolled dumping of wastes on the outskirts of towns and cities continues to be the norm, which has serious implications both for public health as well as environmental pollution, especially groundwater contamination. There are very few successful examples in the area of scientific treatment, disposal and energy generation from waste. The training programme on “Best Practices on Solid Waste Management for Litter free, Dump free, Dustbin free cities in align with “Swachh Bharat Mission” is designed to share the best practices of MSW case studies in urban sector. The programme is structured to offer both conceptual and practical skills, providing the latest knowledge on key aspects of ISWM in promoting and strengthening the service delivery in compliance with MSW 2000 rules. 
Rs.18,400.00 47
07
Feb
2017

07-02-2017 - 09-02-2017
Rs.18,400.00

INTRODUCTION:

With a view to protecting and improving the environment different legislations have been made and different regulations, rules have been issued. The Government of India through its Ministry of Environment and Forests has enacted nationwide comprehensive laws. The Supreme Court has laid down that the “Precautionary Principle” and the “Polluter pays principle” are essential features of “Sustainable Development”. These concepts are part of Environment Law of the Country. To be sustainable, development must possess both economic and ecological sustainability. To attain this, the rules and regulation to be followed by all stakeholders for its effective implementation. As 2016 is the remarkable year of Environment rules and regulations which most of rules has been amended for Environment Protection and for its Sustainable development. 

Rs.18,400.00 50
20
Feb
2017

20-02-2017 9:00 am - 24-02-2017 5:25 pm
Rs.28,750.00

Introduction:

As per Census 2001, 30.66 million urban households which form 35.49% of the urban households suffer from inadequate access to sanitation. According to the Report of the Central Pollution Control Board (2009), the estimated sewage generation from Class - I Cities and Class - II Towns is 38254.82 million liters per day (MLD) out of which only 17787.38 MLD (35%) is being treated and the remaining is disposed of into the water bodies without any treatment, due to which three-fourths of surface water resources are polluted. The Ministry of Urban Development conducted a rating of class I cities on sanitation-related parameters in 2009-10.Out of 423 cities, only four were in the blue category scoring more than 66 points out of 100. No city achieved the distinction of being a green city i.e. a city scoring more than 90 out of 100. According to the Constitution of India, water supply and sanitation is a State subject and the States are vested with the responsibility for planning and implementation of water supply and sanitation schemes including O&M and cost recovery. The 74th amendment envisages transfer of this function to the Urban Local Bodies. However, the Govt. of India supplements the efforts of the States in various ways – sanction of funds for the implementation of projects, technical guidance, capacity building etc. As on date, 111 sewerage schemes at a total estimated cost of Rs. 14,834.14 crores have been sanctioned under the UIG component of JNNURM. 96 sewerage schemes at an estimated cost of Rs. 2862.29 crore have been approved under UIDSSMT component of JNNURM. In recognition of the need for a special focus on sanitation, the National Urban Sanitation Policy was adopted in October 2008 with a focus on elimination of open defecation, integrated city-wide sanitation, proper Operation & Maintenance of all sanitary installations etc. The initiatives under the Policy include rating of cities, awareness generation and support to cities for preparation of city sanitation plans. In 2015, JnNURM was replaced by AMRUT Schemes, which gives importance on “Sewage Systems and Sewage Treatment Plants”. The CPHEEO has brought out a detailed Manual in 2013 on the various aspects of Sewerage & Sewage Treatment.

Rs.28,750.00 50
07
Mar
2017

07-03-2017 9:00 am - 09-03-2017 5:30 pm
Rs.18,400.00

Introduction :

Detailed project report (DPR) for a Sewage Treatment Plant scheme is a base document for implementing the project. It is a document which should fit into the city sanitation plan. Based on this, the detailed steps required can be taken for:

a) Sewage collection,

b) Sewage conveyance,

c) Sewage pumping

d) Sewage treatment

e) Sewage reuse where possible

f) Sludge management

g) Methods of procurement

h) Human resources development and

i) Tariff for sustainable O&M j) Levies as taxes and charges

k) Viability gap funding

ESCI is organizing a 3 day inter-active programme in which each of the above topics will be explained with illustrations of case studies.

Rs.18,400.00 50
14
Mar
2017

14-03-2017 9:00 am - 18-03-2017 5:30 pm
Rs.28,750.00

Introduction:

Safe water supply and hygienic sanitation facilities are the two basic essential amenities the community needs on a top priority for healthy living. As about 80% of water used by the community comes out of houses in the form of waste water which, unless properly collected, conveyed, treated and safely disposed of, may eventually pollute our precious water resources and cause environmental degradation. Hygienic sanitation facilities through low cost on – site sanitation, conventional sewerage and sewage treatment are very important. As of now, as per Central Public Health & Environmental Engineering Organization (CPHEEO) manual on sewerage and sewage system, about 45% of urban population has been provided with reasonable hygienic sanitation facilities in our country.

 

Underground sewerage systems for the cities make very valuable contribution to the process of sustainable urban development. Good sewerage system will protect the environment; improve the community health and the quality of life. For proper design, operation and maintenance of sewerage systems, basic knowledge on planning, estimation of wastewater generation, flow characteristics, design principles of sewers, treatment and disposal methods are very essential. It is the social and civic responsibility of all the authorities to fulfill their obligations to maintain good health and hygiene conditions of the cities and towns.

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