Welcome to Environment Management

Environment Management

19
Feb
2020

19-02-2020 9:00 am - 21-02-2020 5:00 pm
Rs.18,880.00

INTRODUCTION:

Used in drinking water for many years, membranes are being used increasingly in Waste Water Treatment as well. Membrane-based Waste Water Treatment Process is used as an integral part of Waste Water Treatment, creating high-quality Water for Reuse. There are a number of very good reasons to select membrane treatment for Waste Water, which are as follows:

a. Restrictive Discharge Limits

b. Reducing Nutrient Pollution (Phosphorous and Nitrogen)

c. Ground Water Recharge and indirect Potable Reuse

d. Greater removal performances as a result of increased Solid Capture and long Solids Retention Times (SRT)

e. Producing high Reuse Quality Water

f. Effective solution for constrained facility sites

Rs.18,880.00
03
Mar
2020

03-03-2020 9:00 am - 06-03-2020 5:00 pm
Rs.23,600.00

INTRODUCTION :

India’s rapid economic growth in the last two decades has been accompanied by increased levels of urbanization. In India out of the total population of 1210.2 million as on 1st March, 2011, about 377.1 million are in urban areas. The net addition of population in urban areas over the last decade is 91.0 million. The percentage of urban population to the total population of the country stands at 31.6. There has been an increase of 3.35 percentage points in the proportion of urban population in the country during 2001-2011. Municipal services viz., Water, Wastewater, Solid Waste, Heating and Transport are the basic building blocks of efficient, healthy, and economically vital communities. Quality municipal services support the economic development of municipalities, while poor levels of service, interruptions, low coverage levels, and other problems can undermine quality of life in municipalities, retard economic growth, and erode trust between citizens and local governments. Benchmarking is now well recognized as an important mechanism for performance management and accountability in service delivery. It involves the measuring and monitoring of service provider performance on a systematic and continuous basis. Sustained benchmarking can help utilities to identify performance gaps and introduce improvements through the sharing of information and best practices, ultimately resulting in better services to people. Measuring service levels of civic agencies implies measuring outcomes, and thereby indirectly also reflects on institutional capacity, financial performance and other parameters. Service Level Benchmarking has been developed and released by the MoUD and become the cornerstone of the urban reform agenda being implemented as part of various centrally sponsored schemes AMRUT, SMART CITIES, SWACHH BHARAT, HRIDAY AND Housing For All etc..

Rs.23,600.00 50
04
Mar
2020

04-03-2020 9:00 am - 06-03-2020 5:00 pm
Rs.23,600.00

INTRODUCTION:

Air pollution has become a common phenomenon in the urban centres of the country. In recent times, a lot of emphasis has been placed on improving the air quality in urban centres. Air pollution in India is quite a serious issue with the major sources being fuel wood and biomass burning, fuel adulteration, vehicle emission and traffic congestion. In autumn and winter months, large scale choad residue burning in agriculture fields - a low cost alternative to mechanical tilling - is a major source of smoke, smog and particulate pollution. India has a low per capita emissions of greenhouse gases, but the country as a whole is the third largest after China and the United States. The Air (Prevention and Control of Pollution) Act was passed in 1981 to regulate air pollution and there have been some measurable improvements. However, the 2016 Environmental Performance Index ranked India 141 out of 180 countries. Air quality modeling is a tool for predicting the air quality at the places where it is not being monitored and also across the time horizons. It has been used extensively in devising appropriate strategies for air quality management. Moreover, air quality models have been used in environmental impact assessment studies to predict the impact of proposed projects over the air quality of the region, so that mitigation measures can be drawn for pollution prevention. Both the monitoring and modeling of air pollution is essential to provide a picture of the damage humans are doing to the environment, and to enable pollution problems to be discovered and dealt with Air Pollution abatement.

Rs.23,600.00 50
09
Mar
2020

09-03-2020 9:00 am - 11-03-2020 5:00 pm
Rs.18,880.00

INTRODUCTION:

Development through use of technologies is required to improve the standard of living. In view of the fact that Development projects are interfering with the environment, it is essential, before starting a major project, to assess the present environment scenario and, at the same time, it is necessary to assess impact of the same project on the environment during its operation. Environmental concerns have to be addressed rationally before any project is grounded. The Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA) is an effort to anticipate, measure and weigh the socioeconomic and biophysical changes that may result from a proposed project. The objectives of EIA include assessment of existing environmental quality status, prediction of environmental impact of projects, finding ways and means to reduce adverse impacts, shaping the project to suit local environment and presenting the predictions and options to the decisionmakers. MoEF, Govt. of India, has made it mandatory to conduct EIA for all developmental projects. EIA reports prepared based on detailed environmental assessment studies by different consultants and project proponent serve as instruments by which we identify and assess the potential environmental, social and health impacts of a proposed project, evaluate alternatives, and design appropriate environmental and social management plans during the life-cycle of the project Today EIA reports are prepared by a variety of consultants and project proponents have no clear understanding and adequate knowledge to judge the soundness of the report and implications of the findings and recommendations made in it. Many times project proponents are also not aware whether proper methodologies, tools and techniques are used in the studies and in order to make decision makers aware of all these aspects, Engineering Staff College of India is organizing a 3-day Continuing Professional Development Program on “Conducting EIA Study and Preparation of EIA reports – Case Study & Group Discussion”.

Rs.18,880.00 50
24
Mar
2020

24-03-2020 9:00 am - 27-03-2020 5:00 pm
Rs.23,600.00

Introduction:

Safe water supply and hygienic sanitation facilities are the two basic essential amenities the community needs on a top priority for healthy living. As about 80% of water used by the community comes out of houses in the form of waste water which, unless properly collected, conveyed, treated and safely disposed of, may eventually pollute our precious water resources and cause environmental degradation. Hygienic sanitation facilities through low cost on – site sanitation, conventional sewerage and sewage treatment are very important. As of now, as per Central Public Health & Environmental Engineering Organization (CPHEEO) manual on sewerage and sewage system, about 45% of urban population has been provided with reasonable hygienic sanitation facilities in our country. Underground sewerage systems for the cities make very valuable contribution to the process of sustainable urban development. Good sewerage system will protect the environment; improve the community health and the quality of life. For proper design, operation and maintenance of sewerage systems, basic knowledge on planning, estimation of wastewater generation, flow characteristics, design principles of sewers, treatment and disposal methods are very essential. It is the social and civic responsibility of all the authorities to fulfill their obligations to maintain good health and hygiene conditions of the cities and towns.

Rs.23,600.00 37
13
Apr
2020

13-04-2020 9:00 am - 15-04-2020 5:00 pm
Rs.18,880.00

INTRODUCTION:

Biomedical Waste Management is a crucial need in the country today. There is an increasing concern about the harmful effects of biomedical waste generated by health care facilities. Biomedical waste is infectious in nature. Inadequate management of biomedical waste can be associated with risks to healthcare workers, patients, communities and their environment as hospitals are located in prime areas of towns and cities. All these years, biomedical waste was being disposed of along with municipal waste, unaware of its ill effects on the environment. Due to rising legal and social concern, the Ministry of Environment and Forest (MoEFCC) have framed separate rules for safe disposal of Municipal solid waste and Bio-medical waste (BMW). Implementation of biomedical waste management rules has posed a new challenge to hospital management. Many health care centers have not yet established standard practices for inventory and segregation of waste. There is a massive problem of bio-medical waste disposal as several hospitals collect medical waste and dump them in open grounds rather than treating and disposing of them in a safe manner. To ensure safe and proper disposal of biomedical waste, MoEF has notified Biomedical Waste (Management & Handling) Rules, 2016 under the Environment (Protection) Act, 1986 to replace the earlier BMW (M&H) rules 1998 and the amendments thereof. These rules shall apply to all persons who generate, collect, receive, store, transport, treat, dispose or handle biomedical waste in any form. The new rules stipulate that irrespective of the quantum of biomedical waste generation, every occupier of an institution which includes a hospital, nursing home, clinic, dispensary, veterinary institution, animal house, pathological laboratory, blood bank shall apply for the grant of authorization to the prescribed authority. The rules make hospitals and owners of the medical waste treatment facility liable for all damages caused due to improper handling of waste.

Rs.18,880.00 50
22
Apr
2020

22-04-2020 9:00 am - 24-04-2020 5:00 pm
Rs.18,880.00

Introduction:

With urbanization the demand for urban infrastructure facilities like water supply and sewage treatment and disposal is rising sharply, posing a big challenge to urban planners and policymakers. This has thrown up two self-perpetuating problems of providing water supply and collection and disposal of sewage from these towns/cities. The Government of India has taken up the planning and implementation of sewerage system with Sewage Treatment Plants (STPs) for all the cities/towns with the objectives of avoiding environmental pollution, reducing the health risks and thereby improving the health and hygiene conditions of the people. There are the number of STP technologies available to treat the sewage and produce effluent suitable for different options of disposal as well as reuse. To select the appropriate advanced wastewater treatment technology from alternative treatment technologies for the creation of high-quality water for reuse economic analysis is required for which construction costs and Operation and Maintenance (O&M) costs are required. Advanced wastewater treatment methods will remove all nutrients, suspended solids, dissolved solids and toxic substances present in it. As per the CPCB report, it was evident that about 78.7 % of the gap is predominant between the generation of sewage and installation capacity as well as the efficiency of STP working. Hence to fill the gap and sensitize the participants with the importance of the selection of technology, this training programme is framed for its successful technical inputs.

Rs.18,880.00 50
11
May
2020

11-05-2020 9:00 am - 13-05-2020 5:00 pm
Rs.18,880.00

INTRODUCTION:

Development through the use of technologies is required to improve the standard of living. In view of the fact that Development projects are interfering with the environment, it is essential, before starting a major project, to assess the present environment scenario and, at the same time, it is necessary to assess the impact of the same project on the environment during its operation. Environmental concerns have to be addressed rationally before any project is grounded. The Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA) is an effort to anticipate, measure and weigh the socioeconomic and biophysical changes that may result from a proposed project. The objectives of EIA include assessment of existing environmental quality status, prediction of the environmental impact of projects, finding ways and means to reduce adverse impacts, shaping the project to suit the local environment and presenting the predictions and options to the decisionmakers. MoEFCC, Govt. of India, has made it mandatory to conduct EIA for all developmental projects. EIA reports prepared based on detailed environmental assessment studies by different consultants and project proponent serve as instruments by which we identify and assess the potential environmental, social and health impacts of a proposed project, evaluate alternatives, and design appropriate environmental and social management plans during the life-cycle of the project Today EIA reports are prepared by a variety of consultants and project proponents have no clear understanding and adequate knowledge to judge the soundness of the report and implications of the findings and recommendations made in it. Many times project proponents are also not aware whether proper methodologies, tools and techniques are used in the studies and in order to make decision-makers aware of all these aspects, Engineering Staff College of India is organizing a 3-day Continuing Professional Development Program on “Conducting EIA Study and Preparation of EIA reports – Case Study & Group Discussion”.

Rs.18,880.00 50
19
May
2020

19-05-2020 9:00 am - 22-05-2020 5:00 pm
Rs.23,600.00

Introduction:

The basis of this training programme is that the looming water crisis facing the country is not primarily due to a lack of water, but rather arises from mismanagement of water resources. The centralized management paradigm has kept the citizens out and taken away their sense of responsibility towards managing their water. Growing population, water demand and current water delivery system, which is intermittent, not potable and insufficient is creating tremendous pressure on the government who is finding difficulty in raising financial resources to meet the growing water needs as well as to clean up the increasing levels of polluted water. The answer to these solutions is participatory, efficient and sustainable water management which must include planning, system, operation, maintenance, water conservation, reduction of water pollution, etc. The sustainable water management plan must become everybody’s business. Jal Shakti Abhiyan (JSA), a time-bound, mission-mode campaign that would focus on “water-stressed districts of India by focusing on water conservation and water resource management. Initiatives taken under this mission will supplement the water management plan efforts with special interventions like Water Conservation Plans, urban water cycle, promotion of efficient water use for irrigation and a better choice of crops through Krishi Vigyan Kendras.

Rs.23,600.00 50