Power & Energy

28
Jan
2020

28-01-2020 9:00 am - 31-01-2020 5:00 pm
Rs.23,600.00

INTRODUCTION

Power utilities are concerned at the level of losses in their T&D networks and energy audit reports indicate rampant theft of energy as one of the reasons for losses. Several steps have been initiated by utilities for curbing the theft of electrical energy. There is a need to review the existing laws & practices related to the prosecution of offenders in such cases. To avoid legal implications and potential loopholes, the strong need is felt to train inspecting officers in the associated techno-legal matters. This program provides an overview of the legal aspects, including the filing of police cases for power thefts, prosecution of offenders in criminal courts, and case studies of experiences in trial courts, etc. New technological developments in the area of tamper-proof, cost-effective digital energy meters will allow effective metering.

Rs.23,600.00 47
03
Feb
2020

03-02-2020 9:00 am - 05-02-2020 5:00 pm
Rs.17,700.00

INTRODUCTION

The all India installed capacity of Power Plants as on 2nd July 2019 is 360 GW out of which coal-based thermal power plant constitutes 202 GW which is 56% of the total capacity. With the advent of Renewable Energy whose capacity is 80 GW (22% country’s installed capacity), there is an increased focus on thermal power plants which while continuing as baseload station needs to run at lower PLF, yet required to optimize its fuel cost. Coal Pulveriser constitutes an important function in the boiler operation. A coal pulverizer is used to pulverise coal pieces into fine particles before it is sent into the boiler to ensure efficient combustion. The coal so pulverized is in the form of dust and is as fine as face talcum powder. An efficient pulveriser brings down the heat rate of the power plant. Boiler controllable losses are interrelated with pulveriser performance and therefore, O&M Engineer’s attention on pulveriser is critical to optimize the boiler combustion air & fuel inputs. Thus, optimizing of boiler performance starts at the pulveriser. The first part of this programme focuses on the Best Practices in O&M of Coal Pulverising mill. Secondly, the inability of indigenous coal mines in our country to meet the coal requirements of power plants is forcing the country to go for coal imports. Since the coal qualities of indigenous & imported sources are much different, and the boiler, in many cases, are designed for standard Indian coal, blending without proper compatibility can have an adverse impact on boiler performance and also it’s residual life. Thus the second part of this programme takes the participants through the impact of coal characteristics, methods of coal blending, optimization of coal firing and its operational issues and experience.

Rs.17,700.00 50
11
Feb
2020

11-02-2020 9:00 am - 13-02-2020 5:00 pm
Rs.17,700.00

INTRODUCTION

The Electricity Act 2003 which is in force with effect from 10th June 2003 provides a flexible approach to reforms agenda of the sector and also incorporates the progressive provisions like Open Access, Trading in Power, Market Development, etc. By identifying electricity trade as a distinct activity pursuant to regulations of the Central Electricity Regulatory Commission, there is a paradigm shift in the power sector. With coal reserves and hydro resources being scattered in various geographical locations and away from load centers, the emerging electricity markets offer new opportunities for trading of surplus power. Under the evolving market rules, it is being expected that bulk electricity will be traded through a variety of bilateral and multilateral contracts and through Power Exchanges (Px). Those buying and selling electricity through bilateral contracts are likely to include not only generators and suppliers but can be traders as well. With inter-state trading in electricity being considered as an independent and licensed activity, transactions in open access and the volume of power traded on interstate transmission system is steadily growing. In this era of market development, it is important to understand key elements of the sector such as Regional frequency trends, demand and supply profiles, Grid characteristics, Market structures, Commercial issues, etc., besides the processes and procedures applicable to power trading, power exchanges, etc.

Rs.17,700.00 50
18
Feb
2020

18-02-2020 9:00 am - 20-02-2020 5:00 pm
Rs.17,700.00

INTRODUCTION

Demineralized Water (DM Water) constitutes a vital process fluid in power plants and process industry. While DM Water is used as an energy transfer medium in the form of steam in power plants, it is extensively used as an important process fluid in various process industries. Every steam-based power plant and process plant typically set up a dedicated DM Water Plant which supplies DM water of required quality & quantity. DM Water is produced majorly through ion-exchange process which removes most of the cations (Na+, X+, Ca++, Mg++, Fe++, Mn ++ …. etc.) and anions (Cl −, NO3 -, SO4 −−, CO3 −−, HCO3 − ) from water, which otherwise contribute significantly to scaling corrosion, fouling of equipments. Quality of DM Water is, therefore, crucial for the proper functioning of power plants & the process industry as any impurity ingress into DM Water will adversely affect the plant performance and also the equipment life in the long run. Proper operation & maintenance of DM Water Plants, therefore, contributes a great deal to the overall functioning of power plants and process industries that adopt DM Water Plants. This programme takes the participants through various aspects of DM Water Plants, water chemistry including pre-treatment steps, principles of ion-exchange, design & selection of ion-exchange resins (WAC, SAC, WBA, SBA) regeneration aspects, mixed ion-exchange beds, failing of resins and their treatment remedies, …. etc. The program also describes issues & challenges, remedies and the best practices followed in O&M of DM Water Plants serviced in power plants and process industry.

Rs.17,700.00 50
25
Feb
2020

25-02-2020 9:00 am - 27-02-2020 5:00 pm
Rs.17,700.00

INTRODUCTION

The major difficulty faced by the Indian Power Utilities today is the menace of high T&D losses. Further, the Indian Power System is characterized by generation capacity shortages, the ever-increasing demand for energy utilization leading to poor operational efficiency. Unless the Electric utilities adopt more efficient techniques for energy management systems and for the reduction of Technical and Commercial Losses there is little hope of running them efficiently at a reasonable cost. System improvements are to be carried out by the introduction of new technologies in different areas and reducing the losses by accurate assessment of the losses by innovative methods. The aim of providing quality power at an affordable cost to the consumer only remains a slogan until the T&D losses are fully contained. In the new environment, the power utilities are looking to change their business structures to meet the challenge through the use of new technologies in revenue management and loss reduction.

Rs.17,700.00 50
25
Feb
2020

25-02-2020 9:00 am - 27-02-2020 5:00 pm
Rs.17,700.00

INTRODUCTION

As the world searches for more sustainable energy sources, hydropower is currently leading the field. Globally, total renewable energy generation capacity reached 2,351 GW at the end of the last year 2018 – around a third of total installed electricity capacity. Hydropower accounts for the largest share with an installed capacity of 1 172 GW ( around half of the total). In India, by 31st October 2019, the Installed capacity of Large Hydro Power Plants stood at 45399 MW. The thrust given to other renewable energy like wind, solar and micro hydel plants, has resulted in other RE installed capacity of 81372 MW, surpassing the Large hydel capacity. But considering the low cost of Generation , hydro power is one of the preferred green power in terms of economy and prevention of climate change. Construction of new hydro power plant has to take into account, meticulous planning, design and construction of the civil portion of the power plant. It has to take into account the related geo-mechanics, instrumentation , gates, barrages etc. All these are necessary to ensure safe and reliable operation of the power plant. Apart from building new hydro power stations, we need to preserve the life of the existing power stations through best practices in operation and maintenance and also improve the reliability of supply. Not only do hydropower plant repairs take a great deal of time, but due to lost output and unscheduled maintenance, the costs can quickly spiral out of control too. So the best solution is to keep a close eye on all aspects of your operation – including the internal workings of your machinery. With the latest condition monitoring technology, sensors combined with software and data analytics are able to track, measure, and report on the performance of all aspects of your machinery. Different and complementary measurement techniques are available for the monitoring of key parameters of hydropower plant machinery including vibrations, partial discharge, air gap, magnetic field, temperature, etc. The operation of hydro stations is presently mostly automatic and unattended operation of power stations is becoming popular. With the advent of automation, it is possible to regulate the loads and ultimately increase the efficiency of the units. On maintenance side, developments in the methodology in assessment of cavitation, the improved methods of runner repairs in-situ, condition monitoring of the turbine, generator stator and rotor insulation, modern diagnostic and expert systems for monitoring of various parameters, the improved methodologies for dynamic balancing and the revolutionary changes in the metallurgy have ultimately contributed for improving the reliability of the machines and increasing the generation. This programme “Best Practices in Planning, Construction and O&M of Hydro Power Plants” has been designed to expose the participants to the latest developments in these vital areas.

Rs.17,700.00 50