Welcome to Water Resource Development

Water Resource Development

11
Mar
2019

11-03-2019 9:00 am - 15-03-2019 5:00 pm
Rs.29,500.00

INTRODUCTION

Urbanization is an index of transformation from traditional rural economies to modern industrial one. It is a progressive concentration of population in an urban unit. During the last fifty years, the population of India has grown two and a half times, but urban India has increased nearly five times. Urban Local Bodies handle a vast amount and variety of information in the form of maps and documents but in India, it is mostly in paper form. Presently the biggest challenge faced by every local governing authority is the absence of latest updated and accurate data. The detailed maps depicting transportation network, water bodies, plot and survey layout, building footprints, drinking water supply network, sewage and stormwater network, utility lines, locations of solid waste containers & waste disposal plant, etc. are the basic need for all the departments of ULBs that are involved in planning, execution and maintenance of such facilities. Geoinformatics is a comprehensive solution to all the present challenges. Technological growth especially Information Technology and e-governance, in India, are ironical to each other. e-governance in India is still confronting many challenges such as lack of funds to acquire the relevant technology & requisite hardware, lack of IT literacy amongst the workforce, lack of stringent cyber laws, lack of integration of interdependent datasets, etc. This results in delays in decision making and in turn overall development. This can be avoided through systematic and digital handling of the data. Government schemes viz AMRUT (Atal Mission for Rejuvenation and Urban Transformation) & Smart City can effectively utilize these Geoinformatics Technologies.

Rs.29,500.00 50
14
Apr
2019

14-04-2019 9:00 am - 17-04-2019 5:00 pm
Rs.23,600.00

INTRODUCTION

Water is the primary medium through which climate change influences Earth’s ecosystem and thus the livelihood and well-being of societies. Higher temperatures and changes in extreme weather conditions are projected to affect the availability and distribution of rainfall, river flows, snowmelt, groundwater, and water quality. Effective Water Resources management is critical to ensure sustainable development as it affects almost all aspects of the economy, in particular, health, food production and security, domestic water supply and sanitation, energy and industry, and environmental sustainability. Water Resources are diverted for activities in many sectors including Agriculture, Energy, Tourism and Forest. The agriculture sector is the greatest consumer of water in the state, accounting for 75% of the total demand. Increasing population and rising standard of living also led to a great demand for water. Adaptation to climate change is an urgent task and this needs to be recognized by all. Early strategies for addressing climate change focused almost exclusively on mitigation measures (i.e. reduction of greenhouse gas concentrations in the atmosphere). In recent years, more resources have been dedicated to the adaptation of human natural systems to the anticipated impacts of climate change. “Adaptation is the adjustment in natural or human systems in response to actual or expected climatic stimuli or their effects, which moderates harm or exploits beneficial opportunities.” The National Action Plan on Climate Change identifies measures that promote our development objectives while also yielding co-benefits for effective addressing climate change. It outlines a number of steps to simultaneously advance India’s development and climate change related objectives of adaptation and mitigation. There are Eight National Missions which form the core of the National Action Plan, representing multipronged, long-term and integrated strategies for achieving key goals in the context of climate change. A National Water Mission is one of the eight to ensure integrated water resource management helping to conserve water, minimize wastage and ensure more equitable distribution both across and within states. The mission will take into account the provisions of the National Water Policy and develop a framework to optimize water use by increasing water use efficiency by 20% through regulatory mechanisms with differential entitlements and pricing. It will seek to ensure that a considerable share of the water needs of urban areas are met through recycling of wastewater, and ensuring that the water requirements of coastal cities with inadequate alternative sources of water are met through adoption of new and appropriate technologies such as low-temperature desalination technologies that allow for the use of ocean water.

Rs.23,600.00 50
22
Apr
2019

22-04-2019 9:00 am - 24-04-2019 5:00 pm
Rs.29,500.00

INTRODUCTION

The purpose of instrumentation and monitoring in Dams is to maintain and improve dam safety by providing information to 1) evaluate whether a dam is performing as expected and 2)warn of changes that could endanger the safety of a dam. Instrumentation and monitoring combined with vigilant visual observations can provide early warning of many conditions that could contribute to dam failures and unpleasant incidents. Instrumentation and monitoring must be carefully planned and executed to meet defined objectives. Installation of instruments or accumulation of instrument data by itself does not improve dam safety or avoid disasters. It is essential that Instruments are carefully selected, located and installed. Data must be conscientiously collected, meticulously deduced, tabulated, plotted, and must be judiciously evaluated with respect to the safety of the dam in a timely manner. Every instrument in a dam should have a specific purpose. Any instrument which does not serve any specific purpose should find no place in the dam. Instrumentation is used to accurately quantify certain parameters of structural behavior over time and to monitor their rate of change. The scope of the monitoring methods employed depends on the potential risk associated with dam and site characteristics. The use of instrumentation as part of the dam safety program is increasing as the technology of instrumentation and ease of use advances. A Large number of high dams in the world and in our country are located within high seismicity zones, which were affected by strong earthquakes in the past. Seismic monitoring of the dams and the results which are obtained from them has become an increasing need in earthquake engineering and has a considerable contribution to the overall activities for seismic risk reduction. Maximum Credible Earthquake (MEC), Maximum Design Earthquake (MDE) or Safety Evolution Earthquake (SEE): Dams are not inherently safe against earthquakes. In regions of low to moderate seismicity where strong earthquakes occur very rarely, it is sometimes believed (i) that too much emphasis is put on the seismic hazard and earthquake safety of dams, and (ii) that dams designed for a seismic coefficient of 0.1 are sufficiently safe against earthquakes as none of them has failed up to now.

Rs.29,500.00 50