welcome to Water Resource Development

Water Resource Development

08
Aug
2017

08-08-2017 9:00 am - 11-08-2017 5:00 pm
Rs.23,600.00

INTRODUCTION

Many of the world’s irrigated regions face the problem of aging infrastructure and declining revenues to maintain and repair irrigation structures. Policy debates over climate change, population growth, food security, and impacts of irrigation on ecological assets compound the problem, raising the urgency to invest in irrigation infrastructure. Meanwhile, a global call for full cost recovery for water infrastructure investments increases the need to identify the economic value of sustaining irrigation infrastructure. Since 1950, India has made direct public investment of Rs 88100 crore in providing major, medium and minor irrigation infrastructure with an irrigation potential of 91 MHa. India Water Vision, 2025 estimated the gross water demand for multiple uses to double in 25 years from now with corresponding investment needs of Rs 20000 crore per year3 . As of now, India's irrigation infrastructure is expanding by 1.8 Mha of irrigation potential with a public outlay of Rs 7000 crore per annum. Inadequate funding for O&M over years has resulted in the neglect of maintenance and upkeep of the irrigation system leading to deterioration in the quality of irrigation service. Physically, the irrigation and drainage system is not able to receive and deliver the planned quantity of water matching with the demand pattern. Poor irrigation service, often not matching with the crop water requirements over space and time, results in low productivity of crops and income to the irrigators. Resultant dissatisfaction coupled with weak institutional linkage leads to under assessment of demand for water rates as well as low recovery of whatever is assessed. Progressive fall in the cost recovery increases revenue deficit causing adverse impact on O&M funding for maintenance works. Deferred maintenance of surface irrigation infrastructure over years has led to further deterioration of its physical service. This is witnessed by stagnating or falling irrigation coverage affecting agricultural growth in several regions. Surely, with future expansion in food production growth critically depending on the performance of irrigation sector, what is happening to the physical status of existing and expanding irrigation infrastructure does not augur well for India's future food security and agriculture performance. Irrigation management helps in providing best service for farmers to achieve optimum production. Irrigation management is a process in which water resources is all located and utilized sustainability and effectively. Irrigation management can be focused on three elements, namely water, physical structures, and social organization.

Rs.23,600.00 50
28
Aug
2017

28-08-2017 9:00 am - 31-08-2017 5:00 pm
Rs.23,600.00

INTRODUCTION

India has the largest irrigated area ahead of China and USA but is lagging behind these countries in food production. Though irrigation sector’s contribution to agriculture and GDP of the nation is undisputed, there have been serious concerns over its poor performance. Stagnated agriculture has emerged as a challenge during recent years in India’s otherwise progressive performance. To address the major challenges of securing water to meet increasing food production demands of the expanding population, while safe-guarding the critical ecological balance, it is necessary to adopt technological innovations with integrated approach to irrigation water management. These include analyzing the interactions between the adoption and adaptation of irrigation systems to plant level options and field level options, innovations like water harvesting, micro irrigation, atomistic irrigation, conjunctive management of different water sources, institutional reforms and management methodologies. In a comprehensive review of Indian irrigation sector in 1991, World Bank cautioned that India will be critically dependant on a better performance from irrigation sector. It thus identified capacity building in irrigation systems management as one of the thrust areas. The future sustainability of Irrigation Systems will largely depend upon the needed improvements and innovations in this sector in the form of Modernization in its real sense.

Rs.23,600.00 50
05
Sep
2017

05-09-2017 9:00 am - 08-09-2017 5:00 pm
Rs.23,600.00

INTRODUCTION

Performance is a measure of excellence of any system, and Water Resources Sector is no exception. In a comprehensive review of the Indian Irrigation Sector in 1991, the World Bank cautioned that “India will be critically dependent on better performance from Irrigation”. The Review identified four thrust areas. (a) Forging a Coherent Water Policy, (b) Prioritizing Investment and getting Control of Expenditure, (c) Improving Productivity and ensuring sustainability and (d) Building Critical Capacity within the Public and Private Sectors in order to manage the sector more efficiently and effectively. Traditionally Water Policy and Particularly with regard to irrigation sector in our country is paid little attention as far as efficient use of the resource concerned. Despite Irrigation sector contribution to agriculture which registers 28% of GDP and 67% of employment in the country there has been serious concerns over its poor performance and its ability to ensure Indian Food Security. The typology of irrigation management issues facing India are common to many developing countries. Most of these relate to public sector managed surface irrigation systems which are necessarily to be handled at the level of respective states. These issues include poor water management without accountability, progressive deterioration of canal & distributary systems, no link between irrigation services provided and revenue generated, subsidized water charges, no incentives for efficient water use etc. National Water Policy also emphasizes that there is a need to give greater emphasis on the improvement of the performance of the existing Water Resources facilities. Performance of Irrigation Sector means more productive and efficient use of Water – More crop per drop. Bench Marking of Irrigation Projects is widely accepted tool world over to achieve this objective. Therefore, allocation of funds under the Water Resources Sector should be re-prioritized to ensure that the needs for development as well as operation and maintenance of the facilities are met.” Performance Improvement therefore needs strategies to focus on crucial action areas and exploiting hidden irrigation potential within the existing system.

Rs.23,600.00 50
11
Sep
2017

11-09-2017 9:00 am - 15-09-2017 5:00 pm
Rs.29,500.00

INTRODUCTION

Urbanization is an index of transformation from traditional rural economies to modern industrial one. It is a progressive concentration of population in urban unit. During the last fifty years the population of India has grown two and a half times, but urban India has increased nearly five times. Urban Local Bodies handle a vast amount and variety of information in the form of maps and documents but in India it is mostly in paper form. Presently the biggest challenge faced by every local governing authority is absence of latest updated and accurate data. The detailed maps depicting transportation network, water bodies, plot and survey layout, building footprints, drinking water supply network, sewage and storm water network, utility lines, locations of solid waste containers & waste disposal plant, etc. are the basic need for all the departments of ULBs that are involved in planning, execution and maintenance of such facilities. Geoinformatics is a comprehensive solution to all the present challenges. Technological growth especially Information Technology and e-governance, in India, are ironical to each other. e-governance in India is still confronting many challenges such as lack of funds to acquire the relevant technology & requisite hardware, lack of IT literacy amongst the workforce, lack of stringent cyber laws, lack of integration of interdependent datasets, etc. This results in delays in decision making and in turn overall development. This can be avoided through systematic and digital handling of the data. Government schemes viz AMRUT (Atal Mission for Rejuvenation and Urban Transformation) & Smart City can effectively utilize these Geoinformatics Technologies.

Rs.29,500.00 50
25
Sep
2017

25-09-2017 9:00 am - 27-09-2017 5:00 pm
Rs.17,700.00

INTRODUCTION

Drought represents a situation of water shortage, characterized by a prolonged period of nonprecipitation far less than the average. One sixth area of India is considered to be drought – prone. National Water Policy 2002 States that “Drought-prone areas should be made less vulnerable to drought associated problems through soil-moisture conservation measures, water harvesting practices, minimization of evaporation losses, development of ground water potential including recharging and the transfer of surface water from surplus areas where feasible and appropriate. Pastures, forestry or other modes of development which are relatively less water demanding should be encouraged. In planning water resources development projects, the needs of drought-prone areas should be given priority. Relief works undertaken for providing employment to drought-stricken population should preferably be for drought proofing”. The draft National Water Policy 2012 also stresses the need for “Watershed Development activities to be taken in a comprehensive manner to increase soil moisture, reduce sediment yield and increase land and water productivity. To the extent possible, existing programmes like MGNREGA may be used by farmers to harvest rainwater using farm ponds and other soil and water conservation measures”. Based on the experiences of the Watershed Development programmes executed so far, Govt. of India in coordination with the Planning Commission, formulated Common Guidelines for Watershed Development Projects in the year 2008. These guidelines indicate a fresh framework for the future Watershed Development Projects. Implementation of Watershed Development Programems in an integrated manner with holistic approach certainly paves the way to meet the challenges posed by the drought conditions specially in drought prone areas of our country

Rs.17,700.00 50
09
Oct
2017

09-10-2017 9:00 am - 19-09-2017 5:00 pm
Rs.29,500.00

INTRODUCTION

Success of most of the projects being taken up with huge budget outlay in Irrigation, Hydro Power, Highways, Water Supply, Sanitation and Agriculture sectors depends on adequate investigation and data collection efforts. Surveying forms the most important component of investigation. Several States in the country are taking up projects at enormous costs to be completed in phases within short periods. Many of such are time-bound projects funded by Govt. of India and other international agencies. Large projects are also taken up in the areas of Water supply and with external aid from agencies like World Bank, NABARD etc.. The planning and design of all engineering projects are based up on surveying measurements. Moreover, during execution, project of any magnitude is constructed along the lines and points established by surveying. Thus surveying is a basic requirement for all engineering projects. Mapping of above projects primarily those in Irrigation sector have emerged as a major activity of basic importance in the country, mainly because of its relation with inputs of water and production of food. In all the projects, investigation precedes the rest of activities. Investigations mean large scale mapping at micro-level with heights/ contours and also other salient features of the area under consideration. Spatial data can be captured rapidly and accurately using Total Station Surveying Instruments. Differential Global Positioning Systems and Total Stations have emerged as modern standard, affordable, viable digital methodologies for large scale surveys all over the world. It is in this context that ESCI has planned the programme of familiarizing the participants with the use of Total station and DGPS in Project investigations

Rs.29,500.00 50
09
Oct
2017

09-10-2017 9:00 am - 13-10-2017 5:00 pm
Rs.29,500.00

INTRODUCTION

Floods have been a recurring menace in India, causing deaths and destruction besides disruption of normal life with substantial economical loss. Rashtriya Barh Ayog estimated 40 million hectares of land in the country as flood-prone, of which 14.37 Mha only have been provided with reasonable degree of flood protection. On an average floods affect an area of about 7.5 million hectares per year. The computation and management of floods are crucial issues in mitigation of such disaster. For minimizing the losses due to floods, various flood control measures are adopted. The flood control measures termed as “Flood Management” could be either structural measures or nonstructural measures. Wise application of engineering science has afforded ways of mitigating the ravages due to floods and providing reasonable measure of protection to life and property. As per the National Water Policy 2012 :  Adequate flood-cushion should be provided in water storage projects, wherever feasible, to facilitate better flood management”.  Every effort should be made to avert water related disasters like floods and droughts through Structural and Non-structural measures.  Communities need to be involved in preparing an action plan for dealing with the flood / drought situations.

Rs.29,500.00 50