Welcome to Water Resource Development

Water Resource Development

22
Apr
2019

22-04-2019 9:00 am - 24-04-2019 5:00 pm
Rs.29,500.00

INTRODUCTION

The purpose of instrumentation and monitoring in Dams is to maintain and improve dam safety by providing information to 1) evaluate whether a dam is performing as expected and 2)warn of changes that could endanger the safety of a dam. Instrumentation and monitoring combined with vigilant visual observations can provide early warning of many conditions that could contribute to dam failures and unpleasant incidents. Instrumentation and monitoring must be carefully planned and executed to meet defined objectives. Installation of instruments or accumulation of instrument data by itself does not improve dam safety or avoid disasters. It is essential that Instruments are carefully selected, located and installed. Data must be conscientiously collected, meticulously deduced, tabulated, plotted, and must be judiciously evaluated with respect to the safety of the dam in a timely manner. Every instrument in a dam should have a specific purpose. Any instrument which does not serve any specific purpose should find no place in the dam. Instrumentation is used to accurately quantify certain parameters of structural behavior over time and to monitor their rate of change. The scope of the monitoring methods employed depends on the potential risk associated with dam and site characteristics. The use of instrumentation as part of the dam safety program is increasing as the technology of instrumentation and ease of use advances. A Large number of high dams in the world and in our country are located within high seismicity zones, which were affected by strong earthquakes in the past. Seismic monitoring of the dams and the results which are obtained from them has become an increasing need in earthquake engineering and has a considerable contribution to the overall activities for seismic risk reduction. Maximum Credible Earthquake (MEC), Maximum Design Earthquake (MDE) or Safety Evolution Earthquake (SEE): Dams are not inherently safe against earthquakes. In regions of low to moderate seismicity where strong earthquakes occur very rarely, it is sometimes believed (i) that too much emphasis is put on the seismic hazard and earthquake safety of dams, and (ii) that dams designed for a seismic coefficient of 0.1 are sufficiently safe against earthquakes as none of them has failed up to now.

Rs.29,500.00 50
14
May
2019

14-05-2019 9:00 am - 17-05-2019 5:00 pm
Rs.23,600.00

INTRODUCTION:

Water is the primary medium through which climate change influences Earth’s ecosystem and thus the livelihood and well-being of societies. Higher temperatures and changes in extreme weather conditions are projected to affect availability and distribution of rainfall, river flows, snowmelt, groundwater, and water quality. Effective Water Resources management is critical to ensure sustainable development as it affects almost all aspects of the economy, in particular health, food production and security, domestic water supply and sanitation, energy and industry, and environmental sustainability. Water Resources are diverted for activities in many sectors including Agriculture, Energy, Tourism and Forest. The agriculture sector is the greatest consumer of water in the country, accounting for 75% of the total demand. Increasing population and raising standard of living also led to a great demand for water. Adaptation to climate change is urgent task and this needs to be recognized by all. Early strategies for addressing climate change focused almost exclusively on mitigation measures (i.e. reduction of greenhouse gas concentrations in the atmosphere). In recent years, more resources have been dedicated to adaptation of human natural systems to the anticipated impacts of climate change. “Adaptation is the adjustment in natural or human systems in response to actual or expected climatic stimuli or their effects, which moderates harm or exploits beneficial opportunities.” The National Action Plan on Climate Change identifies measures that promote our development objectives while also yielding co-benefits for effective addressing climate change. It outlines a number of steps to simultaneously advance India’s development and climate change related objectives of adaptation and mitigation. There are Eight National Missions which form the core of the National Action Plan, representing multipronged, long-term and integrated strategies for achieving key goals in the context of climate change. A National Water Mission is one of the eight to ensure integrated water resource management helping to conserve water, minimize wastage and ensure more equitable distribution both across and within states. The mission will take into account the provisions of the National Water Policy and develop a framework to optimize water use by increasing water use efficiency by 20% through regulatory mechanisms with differential entitlements and pricing. It will seek to ensure that a considerable share of the water needs of urban areas are met through recycling of waste water, and ensuring that the water requirements of coastal cities with inadequate alternative sources of water are met through adoption of new and appropriate technologies such as low temperature desalination technologies that allow for the use of ocean water.

Rs.23,600.00 49
27
May
2019

27-05-2019 9:00 am - 31-05-2019 5:00 pm
Rs.29,500.00

INTRODUCTION

About 4800 large dams spending enormous amounts have been constructed across the country since independence. In addition to these dams, there were also about 300 large dams constructed prior to independence era. By and large all these dams are performing well, except very few failures. The dams which were constructed long back with the data, design and construction technologies available at that time are to be reviewed in view of the changes in the hydrological inputs, latest design parameters and other technological advancements in terms of Dam Safety Bill 2010 and necessary steps are to be taken to sustain the safety of the dams. However, the Engineers in-charge of the dams should also develop emergency action plans for the dams under their control and implement the same as the situation demands in case of failure. The Dam Safety Bill clearly indicated the institutional mechanism at Central and State level detailing their duties and functions to be discharged by them including the obligation for emergency action plan and disaster management. The dam safety procedures as well as preparation and implementation of emergency action plan should be reviewed periodically and suitably updated based on the latest data and technological advancement including situation demands. The most important activities associated with dam safety are operation & maintenance, regular inspections, proper surveillance and immediate follow up action on the suggestions and recommendations of the inspecting team. Prevention of failures is always appreciated which saves the community from loss of human life, livestock as well as property in addition to intangible grief and distress.

Rs.29,500.00 50
10
Jun
2019

10-06-2019 9:00 am - 14-06-2019 5:00 pm
Rs.29,500.00

INTRODUCTION

Construction projects are increasingly complex, resulting in complex contract documents. Complex construction can likewise often result in complex disputes, which predominantly arise from the intricacy and magnitude of the work, multiple prime contracting parties, poorly prepared and/or executed contract documents, inadequate planning, financial issues, and communication problems. Any one of these factors can derail a project and lead to complicated litigation or arbitration, increased costs, and a breakdown in the parties' communication and relationship. World Bank Conditions, FIDIC and other forms of Contracts have been levying penalties for delay in completion and paying Bonus for early completions However, disputes are bound to occur in any contract and hence their timely resolution is the need of the hour. Delay in resolution of disputes is not the solution. On the contrary it adds up heavy burden of interest cost and therefore timely resolution of the disputes is a necessity. In case the disputes could not be resolved amicably, the parties are free to resort to arbitration and/or conciliation under the provisions of Arbitration and Conciliation Act Contract Management is an unique and important discipline of Project Management. It is in fact emerging as a discipline which is a blend of administrative, technical and legal aspects, with a flavor of E-Procurement and Art. E-Procurement is the business to business purchase and sale of supplies and services over the Internet. More and more organizations are viewing the application of best practices in e-procurement as being essential skill sets needed by all employees involved in the procurement process and Contract Management. The traditional forms of contracts are getting replaced with modern formats such as Build Own Transfer, Turnkey, EPC Contracts, and PPP models etc. The practicing professionals shall be familiar with the new mechanisms / techniques, so as to manage projects in the present scenario. It is in this context, ESCI is organizing 5-day training programme on “Contract Management & Dispute Resolution in Construction Projects”. The price of good Contract Implementation is indeed Eternal Vigilance.

Rs.29,500.00 50
24
Jun
2019

24-06-2019 9:00 am - 28-06-2019 5:00 pm
Rs.29,500.00

INTRODUCTION
Success of most of the projects being taken up with huge budget outlay in Irrigation, Hydro Power, Power Transmission & Distribution Lines, Highways, Water Supply & Sanitation, Construction and Agriculture sectors depends on adequate investigation and data collection efforts. Surveying forms the most important component of investigation. Several States in the country are taking up projects at enormous costs to be completed in phases within short periods. Many of such are time-bound projects funded by Govt. of India and other international agencies. Large projects are also taken up in the areas of Water supply and with external aid from agencies like World Bank, NABARD etc.. The planning and design of all engineering projects are based up on surveying measurements. Moreover, during execution, project of any magnitude is constructed along the lines and points established by surveying. Thus surveying is a basic requirement for all engineering projects.
Mapping of above projects primarily those in Irrigation sector have emerged as a major activity of basic importance in the country and Water Supply Distribution Network. In all the projects, investigation precedes the rest of activities. Investigations mean large scale mapping at micro-level with heights/ contours and also other salient features of the area under consideration. Spatial data can be captured rapidly and accurately using Total Station Surveying Instruments. Differential Global Positioning Systems and Total Stations have emerged as modern standard, affordable, viable digital methodologies for large scale surveys all over the world.
It is in this context that ESCI has planned the programme of familiarizing the participants with the use of Total station and DGPS in Project investigations.

Rs.29,500.00 50