welcome to Water Resource Development

Water Resource Development

23
Apr
2018

23-04-2018 9:00 am - 27-04-2018 5:00 pm
Rs.29,500.00

INTRODUCTION

About 4800 large dams spending enormous amounts have been constructed across the country since independence. In addition to these dams, there were also about 300 large dams constructed prior to independence era. By and large all these dams are performing well, except very few failures. The dams which were constructed long back with the data, design and construction technologies available at that time are to be reviewed in view of the changes in the hydrological inputs, latest design parameters and other technological advancements in terms of Dam Safety Bill 2010 and necessary steps are to be taken to sustain the safety of the dams. However, the Engineers in-charge of the dams should also develop emergency action plans for the dams under their control and implement the same as the situation demands in case of failure. The Dam Safety Bill clearly indicated the institutional mechanism at Central and State level detailing their duties and functions to be discharged by them including the obligation for emergency action plan and disaster management. The dam safety procedures as well as preparation and implementation of emergency action plan should be reviewed periodically and suitably updated based on the latest data and technological advancement including situation demands. The most important activities associated with dam safety are operation & maintenance, regular inspections, proper surveillance and immediate follow up action on the suggestions and recommendations of the inspecting team. Prevention of failures is always appreciated which saves the community from loss of human life, livestock as well as property in addition to intangible grief and distress.

Rs.29,500.00 50
14
May
2018

14-05-2018 9:00 am - 18-05-2018 5:00 pm
Rs.29,500.00

INTRODUCTION

The purpose of instrumentation and monitoring in Dams is to maintain and improve dam safety by providing information to

1) evaluate whether a dam is performing as expected and

2)warn of changes that could endanger the safety of a dam. Instrumentation and monitoring combined with vigilant visual observations can provide early warning of many conditions that could contribute to dam failures and unpleasant incidents.

 

Instrumentation and monitoring must be carefully planned and executed to meet defined objectives. Installation of instruments or accumulation of instrument data by itself does not improve dam safety or avoid disasters. It is essential that Instruments are carefully selected, located and installed. Data must be conscientiously collected, meticulously deduced, tabulated, plotted, and must be judiciously evaluated with respect to the safety of the dam in a timely manner. Every instrument in a dam should have a specific purpose. Any instrument which does not serve any specific purpose, should find no place in the dam. Instrumentation is used to accurately quantify certain parameters of structural behavior over time and to monitor their rate of change. The scope of the monitoring methods employed depends on the potential risk associated with dam and site characteristics. The use of instrumentation as part of dam safety programs is increasing as the technology of instrumentation and ease of use advances. Earth quake is one of the major source of induced dynamic forces that creates structural instability in gravity dams resulting into disasters, though rare. The first failure of a dam due to earth-quake reported in the literature was Auguston Dam during 1886. The milestone in the seismic analysis of dams in India was after 1967 Koyna Earth-quake. Computer softwares have been developed for the static & seismic stability evaluations of gravity dams to help design engineers.

Rs.29,500.00 49
05
Jun
2018

05-06-2018 9:00 am - 08-06-2018 5:00 pm
Rs.23,600.00

INTRODUCTION

Water is the primary medium through which climate change influences Earth’s ecosystem and thus the livelihood and well-being of societies. Higher temperatures and changes in extreme weather conditions are projected to affect availability and distribution of rainfall, river flows, snowmelt, groundwater, and water quality. Effective Water Resources management is critical to ensure sustainable development as it affects almost all aspects of the economy, in particular health, food production and security, domestic water supply and sanitation, energy and industry, and environmental sustainability. Adaptation to climate change is urgent task and this needs to be recognized by all. Early strategies for addressing climate change focused almost exclusively on mitigation measures (i.e. reduction of greenhouse gas concentrations in the atmosphere). In recent years, more resources have been dedicated to adaptation of human natural systems to the anticipated impacts of climate change. “Adaptation is the adjustment in natural or human systems in response to actual or expected climatic stimuli or their effects, which moderates harm or exploits beneficial opportunities.” The National Action Plan on Climate Change identifies measures that promote our development objectives while also yielding co-benefits for effective addressing climate change. It outlines a number of steps to simultaneously advance India’s development and climate change related objectives of adaptation and mitigation. In dealing with the challenge of climate change we must act on several fronts in a focused manner simultaneously. There are Eight National Missions which form the core of the National Action Plan, representing multipronged, long-term and integrated strategies for achieving key goals in the context of climate change. A National Water Mission is one of the eight to ensure integrated water resource management helping to conserve water, minimize wastage and ensure more equitable distribution both across and within states. The mission will take into account the provisions of the National Water Policy and develop a framework to optimize water use by increasing water use efficiency by 20% through regulatory mechanisms with differential entitlements and pricing. It will seek to ensure that a considerable share of the water needs of urban areas are met through recycling of waste water, and ensuring that the water requirements of coastal cities with inadequate alternative sources of water are met through adoption of new and appropriate technologies such as low temperature desalination technologies that allow for the use of ocean water.

Rs.23,600.00 50
25
Jun
2018

25-06-2018 9:00 am - 29-06-2018 5:00 pm
Rs.29,500.00

INTRODUCTION

Floods have been a recurring menace in India, causing deaths and destruction besides disruption of normal life with substantial economical loss. Rashtriya Barh Ayog estimated 40 million hectares of land in the country as flood-prone, of which 14.37 Mha only have been provided with reasonable degree of flood protection. On an average floods affect an area of about 7.5 million hectares per year. The computation and management of floods are crucial issues in mitigation of such disaster. For minimizing the losses due to floods, various flood control measures are adopted. The flood control measures termed as “Flood Management” could be either structural measures or nonstructural measures. Wise application of engineering science has afforded ways of mitigating the ravages due to floods and providing reasonable measure of protection to life and property. As per the National Water Policy 2012 :  Adequate flood-cushion should be provided in water storage projects, wherever feasible, to facilitate better flood management”.  Every effort should be made to avert water related disasters like floods and droughts through Structural and Non-structural measures.  Communities need to be involved in preparing an action plan for dealing with the flood / drought situations. Again draft National Water Policy 2012 states “While every effort should be made to avert water related disasters like floods and droughts, through structural and non-structural measures, emphasis should be on preparedness for flood / drought with coping mechanisms as an option. Greater emphasis should be placed on rehabilitation of natural drainage system”. In highly flood-prone areas, flood control needs to be given overriding consideration in reservoir regulation policy even at the cost of sacrificing some irrigation or power benefits. Besides, increased emphasis should be laid on non – structural measures such as flood forecasting and warning, flood plain zoning and flood proofing for the minimizing of losses and to reduce the recurring expenditure on flood relief. There should be strict regulation of settlements and economic activity in the flood plain zones along with flood proofing, to minimize the loss of life and property. The flood – forecasting activities should be modernized, value – added and extended to other uncovered areas. Inflow forecasting to reservoirs should be instituted for their effective regulation”. Management of floods in the Indian situation has to be organized adopting these guidelines and as per the flood contingency plans formulated by the respective States from time to time.

Rs.29,500.00 49
10
Jul
2018

10-07-2018 9:00 am - 13-07-2018 5:00 pm
Rs.23,600.00
INTRODUCTION
 
India has the largest irrigated area ahead of China and USA but is lagging behind these countries in food production. Though irrigation sector’s contribution to agriculture and GDP of the nation is undisputed, there have been serious concerns over its poor performance. Stagnated agriculture has emerged as a challenge during recent years in India’s otherwise progressive performance.
 
To address the major challenges of securing water to meet increasing food production demands of the expanding population, while safe-guarding the critical ecological balance, it is necessary to adopt technological innovations with integrated approach to irrigation water management. These include analyzing the interactions between the adoption and adaptation of irrigation systems to plant and field level options, innovations like water harvesting, micro irrigation, atomistic irrigation, conjunctive management of different water sources, institutional reforms and management methodologies.
 
In a comprehensive review of Indian irrigation sector in 1991, World Bank cautioned that India will be critically dependent on a better performance from irrigation sector. It thus identified capacity building in irrigation systems management as one of the thrust areas. The future sustainability of Irrigation Systems will largely depend upon the needed improvements and innovations in this sector in the form of Modernization in its real sense.
Rs.23,600.00 50