Welcome to Water Resource Development

Water Resource Development

04
Feb
2020

04-02-2020 9:00 am - 07-02-2020 5:00 pm
Rs.23,600.00

INTRODUCTION

An increase in an urban population in India will increase the pressure on Land and Water Resources. The development will bring a suite of changes in hydrologic quantity and quality and in the behaviour of terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems as a result of increased flooding, decreased groundwater recharge, and increased sediment erosion problems, among others. It will be essential to take appropriate engineering measures to adapt to these anticipated changes. Design and Construction of Urban Stormwater Management Systems presents a comprehensive examination of the issues involved in engineering urban stormwater systems. Despite changes in urban stormwater management practices over the past two decades and the use of many innovative techniques, the tradition continues to govern the design of urban drainage systems. Surface runoff from impervious areas is presently strongly discussed in view of future changes concerning its quantitative and qualitative management within urban water systems. Traditionally, surface runoff was considered as undesired water in developed areas which needed to be diverted as complete and as fast as possible from urban areas. In order to formulate various water resources policies geared towards alleviating problems associated with urbanization, it is important to understand various aspects of urban stormwater management including public education, illicit detection and elimination, engineering controls for stormwater runoff from construction sites, low impact and green infrastructure development, areas of new development and redevelopment, and pollution prevention and “good housekeeping” measures for municipal operations. A sustainable urban water system, or stormwater system, is not only a question of problems and avoiding unwanted content in the water, but it can also be a question of its potential usability as a water resource in society. Stormwater drainage may not only be considered as systems to divert undesired water from urban areas, but also as a valuable element for landscaping the surrounding of buildings and roads.

Rs.23,600.00 50
11
Feb
2020

11-02-2020 9:00 am - 14-02-2020 5:00 pm
Rs.23,600.00

INTRODUCTION

India has the largest irrigated area ahead of China and USA but is lagging behind these countries in food production. Though the irrigation sector’s contribution to agriculture and the GDP of the nation is undisputed, there have been serious concerns over its poor performance. Stagnated agriculture has emerged as a challenge during recent years in India’s otherwise progressive performance. To address the major challenges of securing water to meet increasing food production demands of the expanding population, while safe-guarding the critical ecological balance, it is necessary to adopt technological innovations with an integrated approach to irrigation water management. These include analyzing the interactions between the adoption and adaptation of irrigation systems to plant level options and field level options, innovations like water harvesting, micro-irrigation, atomistic irrigation, conjunctive management of different water sources, institutional reforms and management methodologies. In a comprehensive review of the Indian irrigation sector in 1991, World Bank cautioned that India will be critically dependant on better performance from the irrigation sector. It thus identified capacity building in irrigation systems management as one of the thrust areas. The future sustainability of Irrigation Systems will largely depend upon the needed improvements and innovations in this sector in the form of Modernization in its real sense.

Rs.23,600.00 50
25
Feb
2020

25-02-2020 9:00 am - 28-02-2020 5:00 pm
Rs.23,600.00

INTRODUCTION

India has developed extensive irrigation infrastructure facilities bringing more than 110 million hectares of land under irrigation in minor, medium and major irrigation projects. But the efficiencies of these systems are very low in the range of 25 to 35 percent due to huge amounts of losses during conveyance, distribution, and application of water to the fields. Ineffective Water Resource Management and failure to adopt the latest technologies modified skills and recently developed tools has resulted in poor system Management. Increasing population, finite water resource, excessive demand and more judicious use of water have been identified by experts for initiating canal automation to improve the overall water use efficiency. The advantages of automation are not limited to savings in operation cost but it also alleviates the risk of water logging and salinization. Automation also increases the reliability and accuracy of water distribution and also makes it possible to accurately know the volume of water delivered to a group of farmers or even to individual farmers. This also paves the way for the introduction of volumetric allocation of water and in turn, leads to the equitable distribution of irrigation water. The biggest challenge in the way for improving irrigation productivity (inclusive of crop and water) in India can be attributed to poor last-mile infrastructure, Unorganised farmer associations and ineffective water distribution operation plan. Automation without established last-mile infrastructure, resources and operation plan will prove futile. The state should start working first with streamlining water conveyance network systems before taking up distribution (branches, distributaries and minors). Automation has the potential to provide an improved measurement and control of flows necessary to reduce operational losses and supply water when and where required for more efficient on-farm use. The motivation to pursue automation and modernize irrigation canal operations in India is high as it has the potential to secure the maximum amount of water for India’s future needs. It is well known that the agriculture sector in India utilizes roughly 80% of its available fresh surface water for irrigation which clearly justifies the need and desire to change the water resource management in India. To start with it should be initiated at a policy level and necessary legislation on-farm water entitlements and metering of flows for irrigation should be implemented stringently. Upgrading existing canal system operations needs to be done in stages as a rehabilitation programme. The majority of canal systems in India are operated in a manner that is referred to as a conventional operation. A conventional operation consists of a scheduled delivery, an upstream operational concept and a constant downstream depth operational method but the conventional operation has the shortfall of monitoring inevitable discrepancy between forecast and actual delivery flows. In addition, there will always be inaccuracies in checking the flow and the amount of water stored in the canal pools. Since the canal system is not operated to react to actual demand, any such errors are transferred downstream. Generally, canals are used for water distribution to remote areas. Large canal network is developed in the last few years all over India. The monitoring of canal network is done using Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition (SCADA) system to help in delivering required quantum of water on-time as per the pre-defined schedule by analyzing the complete network for all scheduled / unscheduled requirements. It also generates various reports; trends, graphs, etc. Statistics generated can be utilized for improving the water utility and in turn the canal efficiency. The automation of distribution canals in India particularly to improve water delivery services to end-users by reducing operating cost and improving distribution efficiency.

Rs.23,600.00 50
03
Mar
2020

03-03-2020 9:00 am - 06-03-2020 5:00 pm
Rs.23,600.00

INTRODUCTION

Drainage is an ancient practice, but apparently, until recent times it was regarded as less important. The first drains were most likely ditches for channeling floodwaters back to the rivers. The addition of linings of less porous materials greatly improved drainage efficiency. The most significant 20th-century development in drainage technology was the application of land-grading techniques to facilitate uniform runoff. Surface drainage is especially important for soils that absorb water slowly. The field drains vary in the configuration according to topography, parallel drains being indicated for uniform surfaces and site-specific ones for areas of uneven accumulation. A drainage plan indicates the location and layout of lateral and main drains, outfalls, surface water inlets and other structures in the field. It is a very important document to use for future maintenance. Keep this document with the property deed, so that even if the property ownership changes the drainage information is kept with the farm. Subsurface drainage improves the productivity of poorly drained soils by lowering the water table, providing greater soil aeration, and enabling faster soil drying and improving root zone soil layer condition. The lower portion of sloping paddy fields normally contains excessive moisture and the water table is higher caused by the inflow of groundwater from the upper part of the field resulting in non-uniform water content distribution. Drainage ensures that the soil is properly aerated. If you have excess or standing water it can choke your crops. Drainage reduces soil and nutrient loss from runoff and can help avoid soil erosion. Drainage on hill slopes helps to reduce the risk of soil slippage. Many agricultural soils need good drainage to improve or sustain production or to manage water supplies (Haroun, 2004). Poor drainage (causing water-logged areas) can often be identified by examining the soil color. In zones dominated by longer periods of saturation, and thereby reducing conditions, there can be mottles that occupy small areas and that differ in color from the soil matrix. Ongoing Inspection and Maintenance It is important that the drainage system is periodically inspected and maintained over its life span. The ideal time to inspect the system is in the spring, late fall and after a significant rainfall event – when the soil is wet and the drains are running. Prompt repair of any noted issues will ensure that the system is always in good working order and will prevent a more serious issue from developing. Remember to make records of any maintenance/repairs and changes to the system on the drainage plan. This will ensure that there is always an accurate plan of the system for future inspection and maintenance.

Rs.23,600.00 28
17
Mar
2020

17-03-2020 9:00 am - 20-03-2020 5:00 pm
Rs.23,600.00

INTRODUCTION

Irrigation demand of a region depends upon the areas irrigated with surface water and groundwater, different crop water requirements and the irrigation application efficiency. Growth in agriculture sector on sustained basis is closely linked with judicious utilization of land and water resources for sustainable production and productivity of agricultural and horticulture crops. Presently, a number of departments/Ministries are involved in implementation of various Programmes for addressing the issues relating to development of land and water resources. Out of about 142 million hectare of cultivable land in the country, only 65 million hectare (45%) is currently covered under irrigation. Substantial dependence on rainfall makes cultivation in remaining areas a high risk and less productive profession. District Irrigation Plans (DIPs) is the important feature for planning and implementation of PMKSY. It will present holistic irrigation development perspective of the district outlining medium to long term development plans integrating water sources distribution network. The District Irrigation Plan includes information on all sources of available water, distribution network, defunct water bodies, new potential water sources both surface and subsurface systems, application& conveyance provisions, crops and cropping system aligned to available/designed quantity of water and suitable to local agroecology. Proper integration of the creation of sources like dams and water harvesting structures, distribution systems like canals and command area development works and precision farming is made for the deriving best possible use of water resources. To use the available water resources in the district to the maximum potential in an efficient way catering to the basic needs of every living being and enhancing the livelihoods of rural population to the maximum extent thus alleviating poverty in a sustainable way without compromising the interests of future generations. The competing demands for water resources and the emerging issues and concerns were to be addressed through certain basic principles and commonality in approaches in dealing with planning, development and management of water resources under an Integrated Water Resource Management framework. The typology of irrigation management issues facing India are common to many developing countries. Most of these relate to public sector managed surface irrigation systems which are necessarily to be handled at the level of respective states. These issues include poor water management without accountability, progressive deterioration of canal & distributary systems, no link between irrigation services provided and revenue generated, subsidized water charges, no incentives for efficient water use, etc. Soil and water resources are important for the sustainability of agriculture and the environment. Deforestation, over-grazing, intensive cultivation, mismanagement of cultivated soils and intensive urbanization are major factors triggering the soil erosion. Different control measures should be adopted to protect the soil resources against erosion. It is, therefore, pre-requisite that soil conservation practices should be adopted. Geospatial Technology plays an important role in thematic information for preparation for water resource and land resource development plan.

Rs.23,600.00 50