welcome to Water Resource Development

Water Resource Development

25
Sep
2017

25-09-2017 9:00 am - 27-09-2017 5:00 pm
Rs.17,700.00

INTRODUCTION

Drought represents a situation of water shortage, characterized by a prolonged period of nonprecipitation far less than the average. One sixth area of India is considered to be drought – prone. National Water Policy 2002 States that “Drought-prone areas should be made less vulnerable to drought associated problems through soil-moisture conservation measures, water harvesting practices, minimization of evaporation losses, development of ground water potential including recharging and the transfer of surface water from surplus areas where feasible and appropriate. Pastures, forestry or other modes of development which are relatively less water demanding should be encouraged. In planning water resources development projects, the needs of drought-prone areas should be given priority. Relief works undertaken for providing employment to drought-stricken population should preferably be for drought proofing”. The draft National Water Policy 2012 also stresses the need for “Watershed Development activities to be taken in a comprehensive manner to increase soil moisture, reduce sediment yield and increase land and water productivity. To the extent possible, existing programmes like MGNREGA may be used by farmers to harvest rainwater using farm ponds and other soil and water conservation measures”. Based on the experiences of the Watershed Development programmes executed so far, Govt. of India in coordination with the Planning Commission, formulated Common Guidelines for Watershed Development Projects in the year 2008. These guidelines indicate a fresh framework for the future Watershed Development Projects. Implementation of Watershed Development Programems in an integrated manner with holistic approach certainly paves the way to meet the challenges posed by the drought conditions specially in drought prone areas of our country

Rs.17,700.00 50
09
Oct
2017

09-10-2017 9:00 am - 19-09-2017 5:00 pm
Rs.29,500.00

INTRODUCTION

Success of most of the projects being taken up with huge budget outlay in Irrigation, Hydro Power, Highways, Water Supply, Sanitation and Agriculture sectors depends on adequate investigation and data collection efforts. Surveying forms the most important component of investigation. Several States in the country are taking up projects at enormous costs to be completed in phases within short periods. Many of such are time-bound projects funded by Govt. of India and other international agencies. Large projects are also taken up in the areas of Water supply and with external aid from agencies like World Bank, NABARD etc.. The planning and design of all engineering projects are based up on surveying measurements. Moreover, during execution, project of any magnitude is constructed along the lines and points established by surveying. Thus surveying is a basic requirement for all engineering projects. Mapping of above projects primarily those in Irrigation sector have emerged as a major activity of basic importance in the country, mainly because of its relation with inputs of water and production of food. In all the projects, investigation precedes the rest of activities. Investigations mean large scale mapping at micro-level with heights/ contours and also other salient features of the area under consideration. Spatial data can be captured rapidly and accurately using Total Station Surveying Instruments. Differential Global Positioning Systems and Total Stations have emerged as modern standard, affordable, viable digital methodologies for large scale surveys all over the world. It is in this context that ESCI has planned the programme of familiarizing the participants with the use of Total station and DGPS in Project investigations

Rs.29,500.00 50
09
Oct
2017

09-10-2017 9:00 am - 13-10-2017 5:00 pm
Rs.29,500.00

INTRODUCTION

Floods have been a recurring menace in India, causing deaths and destruction besides disruption of normal life with substantial economical loss. Rashtriya Barh Ayog estimated 40 million hectares of land in the country as flood-prone, of which 14.37 Mha only have been provided with reasonable degree of flood protection. On an average floods affect an area of about 7.5 million hectares per year. The computation and management of floods are crucial issues in mitigation of such disaster. For minimizing the losses due to floods, various flood control measures are adopted. The flood control measures termed as “Flood Management” could be either structural measures or nonstructural measures. Wise application of engineering science has afforded ways of mitigating the ravages due to floods and providing reasonable measure of protection to life and property. As per the National Water Policy 2012 :  Adequate flood-cushion should be provided in water storage projects, wherever feasible, to facilitate better flood management”.  Every effort should be made to avert water related disasters like floods and droughts through Structural and Non-structural measures.  Communities need to be involved in preparing an action plan for dealing with the flood / drought situations.

Rs.29,500.00 50
23
Oct
2017

23-10-2017 9:00 am - 25-10-2017 5:00 pm
Rs.17,700.00

INTRODUCTION

Water is the primary medium through which climate change influences Earth’s ecosystem and thus the livelihood and well-being of societies. Higher temperatures and changes in extreme weather conditions are projected to affect availability and distribution of rainfall, river flows, snowmelt, groundwater, and water quality. Effective Water Resources management is critical to ensure sustainable development as it affects almost all aspects of the economy, in particular health, food production and security; domestic water supply and sanitation; energy and industry; and environmental sustainability.

Rs.17,700.00 50
07
Nov
2017

07-11-2017 9:00 am - 10-11-2017 5:00 pm
Rs.23,600.00

INTRODUCTION

The purpose of instrumentation and monitoring in Dams is to maintain and improve dam safety by providing information to

1) evaluate whether a dam is performing as expected and

2)warn of changes that could endanger the safety of a dam. Instrumentation and monitoring combined with vigilant visual observations can provide early warning of many conditions that could contribute to dam failures and unpleasant incidents.

Instrumentation and monitoring must be carefully planned and executed to meet defined objectives. Installation of instruments or accumulation of instrument data by itself does not improve dam safety or avoid disasters. It is essential that Instruments are carefully selected, located and installed. Data must be conscientiously collected, meticulously deduced, tabulated, and plotted, and must be judiciously evaluated with respect to the safety of the dam in a timely manner. Every instrument in a dam should have a specific purpose. If it does not have a specific purpose, it should not be installed or it should be abandoned. Instrumentation is used to accurately quantify certain parameters of structural behavior over time and to monitor their rate of change. The scope of the monitoring methods employed depends on the potential risk associated with dam and site characteristics. The use of instrumentation as part of dam safety programs is increasing as the technology of instrumentation and ease of use advances. Earth quake is one of the major source of induced dynamic forces that creates structural instability in gravity dams resulting into disasters, though rare. The first failure of a dam due to earth-quake reported in the literature was Auguston Dam during 1886.

The milestone in the seismic analysis of dams in India was after 1967 Koyna Earth-quake. Computer softwares have been developed for the static & seismic stability evaluations of gravity dams to help design engineers.

Rs.23,600.00 50
21
Nov
2017

21-11-2017 9:00 am - 24-11-2017 5:00 pm
Rs.23,600.00

INTRODUCTION

India has the largest irrigated area ahead of China and USA but is lagging behind these countries in food production. Though irrigation sector’s contribution to agriculture and GDP of the nation is undisputed, there have been serious concerns over its poor performance. Stagnated agriculture has emerged as a challenge during recent years in India’s otherwise progressive performance. To address the major challenges of securing water to meet increasing food production demands of the expanding population, while safe-guarding the critical ecological balance, it is necessary to adopt technological innovations with integrated approach to irrigation water management. These include analyzing the interactions between the adoption and adaptation of irrigation systems to plant level options and field level options, innovations like water harvesting, micro irrigation, atomistic irrigation, conjunctive management of different water sources, institutional reforms and management methodologies. In a comprehensive review of Indian irrigation sector in 1991, World Bank cautioned that India will be critically dependant on a better performance from irrigation sector. It thus identified capacity building in irrigation systems management as one of the thrust areas. The future sustainability of Irrigation Systems will largely depend upon the needed improvements and innovations in this sector in the form of Modernization in its real sense.

Rs.23,600.00 50
27
Nov
2017

27-11-2017 9:00 am - 30-11-2017 5:00 pm
Rs.23,600.00

INTRODUCTION

To derive the maximum benefit from any Water Resources Project, regulated releases of Water from the reservoir and optimum utilization of such water are of utmost importance. Hydraulic Gates and handling equipments like hoists form the vital components for controlling the discharges through the dam, canals, tunnels, penstocks and outlets. The most important aspects related to the selection of suitable type of gates and their hoisting mechanism based upon the purpose and location include their design and drawings, manufacture & fabrication, testing in factory / field workshop, Transportation to the site of Installation, Erection at the site in a defined sequence and field testing (no-load and full load, or dry and wet testing). Besides, the operation of the gates as per the system requirements and scheduled maintenance as per supplier’s recommendations also form critical steps. For systematic O&M, it is also essential to have a Comprehensive Manual. The O&M staff should not only be conversant with the contents of the Manual, but should also be trained suitably for the job so as to ensure safe operation and effective maintenance of the gates and hoists, in accordance with the requirements and situation.

Rs.23,600.00 50
18
Dec
2017

18-12-2017 9:00 am - 22-12-2017 5:00 pm
Rs.29,500.00

INTRODUCTION

Dams have been constructed for millennia, influencing the lives of humans and the ecosystems they inhabit. Gravity dams are solid concrete structures that maintain their stability against design loads from the geometric shape, mass and strength of the concrete. In the design of gravity dams, it is essential to determine the loads required for its stability. The structural response of material to different loads determines as to how it can economically be utilized in the design process. The large amount of water stored in a dam makes its failure to be catastrophic. Design and execution are very crucial for this kind of structures. Exceptional loadings must be taken in account during design phase, because of its highly destructive potential and social importance. Earthquake is one such natural disaster that has claimed many lives and destroyed lots of property, thus necessitating seismic analysis of concrete gravity dams. Many concrete gravity dams have been in service for over 60 years. Over this period many advancements in the methodologies and safety procedures have come in to vogue. Older existing dams often fail to meet these revised evaluation processes and norms. Safety criteria and structural rehabilitation to meet such criteria for these old structures may be costly and difficult. Traditional design procedure (also known as the pseudo-static or seismic coefficient method) was applied worldwide in dam design. Though, this procedure was an excellent for its time, as it provided a basis for computing earthquake forces, in the design of dams”. However, the well studied example of Koyna Dam subjected to the 1967 earthquake, demonstrated that the assumptions made in the traditional design procedure may underestimate earthquake forces, and lead to structural failure. The seismic safety of dams has been a serious concern since then which has been regarded as a watershed event in the development of seismic analysis and design of concrete gravity dams all over the world. Dams are particularly different from other types of structures, since stress analysis of these structures has to take into account dynamic response of the complete system interaction involving Dam Reservoir and Foundation.

Rs.29,500.00 50