Welcome to Water Resource Development

Water Resource Development

09
Feb
2021

09-02-2021 - 12-02-2021
Rs.7,080.00

Introduction

Water is the most crucial input for agricultural production. Agriculture is the biggest water consumer. It uses around 70 percent of all freshwater withdrawals worldwide. With a growing world population, agriculture will face more competition from industrial and domestic water users. This is why agriculture will have to use water more efficiently. The irrigated area in developing countries is expected to increase by 40 million hectares (20 percent) by 2030. By 2050, the human population is projected to increase to 9 billion people and it is estimated that 70% of additional food has to be produced in order to feed humanity over the next 40 years. Water demands increase not only for food production but also for other sectors like industry, domestic, power, etc to meet the needs of the increased population. Strategies for efficient management of water for agricultural use involves reduction in water losses in conveyance and distribution system through periodic maintenance, applying the right quantity at right time, the participation of farmers in water management, right cultivation techniques and irrigation practices including increased use of water-saving devices like sprinkler and drip, conjunctive use of surface and ground waters and moisture conservation practices. The use of pressurized irrigation technology could increase water-use efficiency and reduce cost. The Government of India has been implementing a Centrally Sponsored Scheme on Per Drop More Crop with the objective to enhance water use efficiency in the agriculture sector. Under the scheme, technological interventions like drip & sprinkler irrigation systems are promoted to encourage the farmers to use them for conservation and saving of water & improved yield. The positive outcomes of micro-irrigation have made food security effective due to an increase in production and productivity of different crops and increased area under irrigation from the same source of water resulting in enhanced nutritional security for the country. In this context, there is an urgent need to resolve the water problems through smarter agriculture practices and better water management including the modernization of irrigation systems which enable the rural people to have a better livelihood opportunity.

Rs.7,080.00 50
23
Feb
2021

23-02-2021 - 26-02-2022
Rs.29,500.00

Introduction

Water is the most important natural resource on the planet. According to the Water Resources Information System of India, 85 percent of the country’s rainfall during the summer monsoon season between July and September. India annually receives about 4000 km3 of water from precipitation, but due to exclusive rainfall patterns and their mismanagement, leads to wastage of water. For decades, Indian engineers and hydrologists have attempted to find ways to move water from areas of abundance to regions that have limited water supplies. Changes in the hydrological profile of Indian rivers, whether by climate change or changes in the volume of water withdrawn from them, could leave current surplus rivers with a deficit. The amount of water in many of the Himalayan rivers, for instance, depends on the amount of glacial melt present in the system. It is assumed that regions and rivers with a surplus of water will continue to have abundant water supplies. The water demand for irrigation arises when rainfall is not sufficient to meet the water demand for raising crops and obtaining optimum crop yields. The annual rainfall is sufficient to meet the water requirements in the kharif in the country. Irrigation is required essentially to tide over insufficient soil moisture during dry spells within the season. Agriculture is the largest water user and more than 85% of water from wells, tubewells, tanks and canals are used for irrigation purposes. The water demand is increasing and will continue to be, by far, the biggest claimant on available water supplies. There is much scope for enhancing the water use efficiency of irrigation systems by reducing wastage of water such as runoff, seepage, evaporation, interflow and so on, and through efficient on-farm water management practices. By creating a network of rivers flood & drought problems can be greatly avoided by channeling excess water to areas that are not experiencing a flood or are dry. All interlinking schemes are aimed at transferring water from one river system to another or by lifting across natural basins. If water transferred from water abundant rivers to water-deficit areas, there would be an adequate supply for everyone in every part of the country. It also appears to promote national integration. Interlinking of rivers involves multidisciplinary data on hydrological, environmental, agricultural, socioeconomic. Geospatial technologies provide the scientific environment to store and analyse multidisciplinary data for solving real-world problems. These technologies are useful in solving the various issues of interlinking in order to expedite the process of interlinking.

Rs.29,500.00 50
09
Mar
2021

09-03-2021 - 12-03-2021
Rs.7,080.00

Introduction

India is having a long coastline of about 7500 km and it is under serious threat from erosion. Around 40% of the Indian coast is subjected to erosion both natural and manmade causes according to the study conducted by various agencies despite the development of a wide range of measures to protect shorelines from eroding and flooding. The prospect of further sea-level rise due to climate change and the heritage of mismanagement in the past - such as inappropriate infrastructure and resources - implies that coastal erosion will be a growing concern in the future. The impact of erosion is not seen immediately as in the case of a tsunami or storm surge. But it is equally important when we consider loss of material/property. It generally takes months or years to note the impact of erosion; therefore, this is generally classified as a "long term coastal hazard". Managing coastal systems is hence an increasing challenge for all those who have to take decisions or provide services about coastal development and conservation especially in erosion prone areas. The erosion of the beaches takes place due to the unplanned construction of structures in the coastal zone. Due to the establishment of many features, housing, and Tourism along the coast, there is an exploitation of ocean resources. Geospatial techniques are very useful and functional for the pointing and management of valuable coastal locations susceptible to erosion and rising water levels. The long stretches of the coastline are facing a severe threat from erosion due to natural reasons and manmade activities. In view of the increasing erosion trends and haphazard developments in the coastal areas, suitable engineering measures are of paramount importance for the sustainable development of coastal stretches.

Rs.7,080.00 50